Family Immigration

family and individual immigration, picture attribution to moodboard on Flickr

Temporary (Non-Immigrant) Family Visas

Are you ready to marry your foreign-citizen fiancé? Our office can help you prepare and file the necessary forms and petitions required by USCIS to obtain the necessary visa and bring your foreign-citizen fiancé to the United States.

K-1 Fiancé Visa

The K-1 fiancé nonimmigrant visa is for the foreign-citizen fiancé of U.S. citizens who are entering the country for the sole purpose of getting married within 90 days of their admission. Minor children of the K-1 visa-holder are eligible as derivatives for admission under the K-2 visa. Individuals must establish that they have the legal capacity to marry, that they met the U.S. citizen within two years of filing the petition, and that they are otherwise admissible or eligible for a waiver.

K-2 Visa for Minor Child of K-1 Fiancé of U.S. citizen

Temporary (Non-Immigrant) Family Visas

Is your foreign-citizen spouse the beneficiary of an immigration petition? Our office can help you prepare and file the necessary forms and petitions required by USCIS to obtain the necessary visa and bring your foreign-citizen spouse to the United States.

K-3 Visa for Spouse of U.S. citizen

The K-3 nonimmigrant visa is for the foreign-citizen spouse of a United States citizen who is the beneficiary of an immigrant petition and is awaiting approval of the petition outside of the United States. Under the DOS rule, the K-3 visa applicant must demonstrate that:

  • His or her marriage to a U.S citizen is valid;
  • He or she is the beneficiary of an immigrant visa petition filed to accord status to the applicant as an immediate relative;
  • He or she is the beneficiary of an approved nonimmigrant visa petition; and
  • He or she wishes to enter the United States to await the approval of the I-130 petition or the availability of an immigrant visa. The nonimmigrant visa petition must have been filed in the United States by the U.S. citizen spouse of the applicant.

Duration of Stay

K-3 nonimmigrants will be admitted into the United States for a period of two years.

 

K-4 Visa for Child of K-3 Spouse

A child (unmarried and under 21 years of age) of a foreign-citizen spouse entitled to K-3 classification may accompany the K-3 parent. The child will be granted K-4 status as long as they can establish that they are the child (unmarried and under 21 years of age) of a foreign-citizen spouse entitled to K-3 classification.

 

Duration of Stay

A child of a foreign-citizen spouse will be admitted for two years or until the day before the child’s 21st birthday, whichever is shorter.

 

Green Cards through family

 Are you a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident and want to sponsor a family member to become permanent resident that is authorized to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis? Our office can help with every aspect of your family-based immigrant visa application. Learn more about Green Cards through family.

 Additional Family Immigration Services

Asylum

If you are coming to the United States because you are seeking protection because you have suffered persecution or fear that you will suffer persecution due to your race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion then you may be eligible for asylum. If you are eligible for asylum then you may be able to remain in the United States.

Detention and Removal Proceedings

If you have been placed in removal proceedings we can help provide you with a defense against your deportation proceedings. We can also assist you if you have been detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Immigration Appeals

We also help families and individuals with their immigration appeals. If your application for immigration or a visa is denied you may be able to appeal the decision. We work with applicants to review their application and possible reasons for its denial and will help clients through the appeals process. Each situation is unique and we can help explain your specific reason for denial and, if possible, appeal that decision on your behalf.